Chukat


You can find the rest of the parsha text on Chabad.org at Chukat.

38 thoughts on “Chukat

  1. Wendy

    From Reb Mimi Feigelson 2009

    The Kiss of Death – The Water of Life

    In this week’s Torah reading both Miriam and Aharon die. Despite the difference in the description of their deaths, Rashi, quoting the Babylonian Talmud (Mo’ed Katan, 28a), teaches us that she too was among the seven that died ‘al pi Hashem’ / by the mouth of God. This is considered to be the highest form of death, the easiest death. It is a death in which the image that is offered is that God, so-to-speak, inhales into God’s-self the last breath of the person, as they exhale. The reason this isn’t expressed explicitly in the verse (Bamidbar/Numbers 20:1), why it doesn’t say ‘al pi Hashem’ regarding Miriam’s death, Rashi quotes for us, is that it isn’t respectful to say that God kissed a woman. The anthropomorphic and gender layers of this reading scream out to us to redeem all the components of this Talmudic segment.

    Unless you are aware of the biography of the Piastzna Rebbe (Reb Klonimus Kalman Shapiro, 1888-1943) you may think it interesting that it is a Chassidic Rebbe that challenges the integrity of the Talmud. In his teaching’s on parashat Chukat, that he taught in the Warsaw ghetto, published in his known commentary, The Aish Kodesh, he poses this challenge based on an earlier question that he raises.

    His first question is based on the Babylonian Talmud (Ta’anit 9a), that Rashi also quotes in our parasha, as to the connection between Miriam’s death and the lack of water that the children of Israel are plagued with:
    “Then came the children of Yisrael, the whole congregation, abode in Kadesh, and Miriam died there, and was buried there. And there was no water for the congregation…” (Bamidbar/Numbers 20:1-2)

    The Talmud teaches us that the reason these two versus are adjacent to each other is because the well was in Miriam’s merit, and with her death the well dried up. Elsewhere we are taught that there were three gifts that sustained us in the desert: the manna in Moshe’s merit, the clouds of glory in Aharon’s merit, and the well in Miriam’s merit.

    In his humbleness the Piasetzna Rebbe says that we have no way to understand the greatness of such a tzadeket / righteous woman like Miriam, but non-the-less, he aspires to understand what does this connection between Miriam and the well come to hint to us.

    The paradigm that he introduces is one that I remember shedding many words (and even some tears) over in my high school years. It is the teaching of Rabbi Chanina in the Babylonian Talmud (Bava Kama 38b): “Greater is the one that is commanded and fulfills the commandment then the one that is not commanded and fulfills the commandment”. It always seemed to me that when an intention, followed by an action, comes from within one’s own personal drive it surpasses an external commandment / obligation. Tosafot, Rashi’s grandchildren, (Babylonian Talmud, Kiddushin 31a), suggest that the reason for Rabbi Chanina’s statement is that the commanded person will be even more careful in the fulfillment of the commandment due to their concern to correctly fulfill their obligation. From here we can derive that seemingly, when the obligation comes from within then there lies the danger of laxness, since the volunteer is the sole authority behind the deed.

    When challenging this opinion as often presented by my teachers, and as adopted throughout the Halacha, I would suggest a perspective drawing on altruism, self-sacrifice, intimacy as ways to contest this opinion.

    I didn’t know that I could quote the Babylonian Talmud (Gittin 20a) that teaches us that ‘the reward for a mitzvah is the reward for a mitzvah’ even when the person was not obligated from the outset to perform it. I also didn’t know that I could quote the Piasetzna Rebbe…

    First he clarifies that it is hard to understand the Talmud, as brought by Rashi, since clearly we are not talking about a physical kiss! Clearly we can’t say it isn’t God’s glory, ‘kavod shel ma’alah’ to say that God kissed her, since we aren’t talking about a corporeal kiss at all! It is here that the Piasetzna Rebbe will follow the practice of many before him and offer an interpretation on Rashi himself. Based on his father’s teachings, the Piasetzna Rebbe suggests that ‘kavod shel ma’alah’ means glory that was commanded from above, and Miriam represents the voice, and actions, of those that are not commanded and non-the-less set out to fulfill God’s commandments. Therefore the verse can’t say ‘al pi Hashem’ / by the mouth of God, because the generator of her actions was internal, and did not come as a commandment from above!

    It is for this reason we can now understand the relationship between Miriam and the well, since the well is perceived as a self generated, self contained source of water. Miriam is the well, and when she dies, the well dies with her.

    The last question left for us to solve is what drives the Piasetzna Rebbe to contest such a broadly accepted halachic paradigm, “Greater is the one that is commanded and fulfills the commandment then one that is not commanded and non-the-less fulfills the commandment”. What demands of him to voice the voice of those that generate from within themselves their desire to serve God, to go beyond what they were commanded to do?

    His love and respect to his wife seems to be the key to this puzzle. The Piasetzna’s wife, Miriam, was known for her piety and rabbinic scholarship. It is told that she would learn Torah four hours every day. It is told that once someone sent the Rebbe a question that he began to answer before he had to leave the house. When he came back home the responsa had been completed by his wife Miriam. The source of this story has shared that you can see the shift in the handwriting mid responsa. It begs to be understood that since the tzadeket / the righteous woman Miriam Shapiro of Piasetzna left the world this week, seventy years ago, the 10th of tamuz 1939, Shabbat parashat chukat, she is the prototype for the Miriam that the Piasetzna Rebbe see’s in Miriam, Moshe and Aharon’s sister. He see’s the reflection of both Miriam’s in Miriam-the-prophetess’s well. The well that his wife Miriam revived through her Torah study.

    May we follow in the footsteps of Yitzchak who dug up the dried up wells of his father Avraham. May we follow in the footsteps of Miriam Shapiro (of blessed memory) and in our Torah study dig up the well of Miriam the prophetess. And may we too merit, at the end our days, to return our souls to God with a kiss.

    Shabbat shalom.

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  2. Wendy

    From Rabbi Rachel Barenblat

    Choice and change (Radical Torah repost) Here’s the d’var Torah I wrote in 2007 for the first of this week’s portions, originally published at Radical Torah

    In Kedushat Levi, Rabbi Levi Yitzchak of Berditchev offers some striking insights into this week’s Torah portion of Chukat, riffing off of the first verse in the parsha, “This is the law of the instructed-ritual that YHVH has commanded, saying: Speak to the Children of Israel, that they may take you a red cow, wholly-sound, that has in it no defect, that has not yielded to a yoke[.]'” (Numbers 19:2, transl. Everett Fox.) Levi Yitzchak writes:

    In our world, it appears to us as if we were created to engage in the things of this world. But in truth, that is not the case. The primary reason that we were created was so that we might come to recognize the unity of the Holy Blessed One…

    That is the sense of “This is the law of the Torah:” there are mitzvot that reason compels us to perform. When we do them, we do not sense so strongly that we are performing them because the Creator commanded these mitzvot. That is why the Blessed Creator gave us commandments that reason does not comprehend. When we do them, we more readily recognize that we do them only because of God’s commandment.

    It’s easy to understand why ethical commandments are important. How we treat one another matters. But ritual commandments, especially ones (like the red heifer) which don’t make much sense — those can be harder to cherish. For Levi Yitzchak, the illogic of a chok (a commandment which can’t be made to fit our sensible paradigm) is precisely what makes it important. In accepting the chukim, we accept the “yoke of heaven” and acknowledge God’s sovereignty.

    There’s something beautiful about that. It affirms that there are things in this vast universe which are beyond our comprehension and beyond our control. That life isn’t all about us. That, as Levi Yitzchak writes, we were created for an ineffable purpose — recognizing the fundamental unity of infinite God! All of our strivings and disagreements and philosophical ruminations are not the point. Performing chukim has an impact on our spiritual awareness. They’re devotional practices, not intellectual exercises.

    There’s also something difficult about it. The red cow becomes a kind of red flag. Maybe especially for women, who may feel that we are always already trying to break free from the expectation that we will submit ourselves to priorities which come from someone else. The world is too full of hierarchy and power-over, and siting ourselves in a position of submission to incomprehensible mitzvot can feel like another iteration of the same old song and dance.

    The Mishna talks about accepting the yoke of heaven upon ourselves, but what does that even mean, in a day and age when few of us have ever even seen oxen yoked? It’s easy for the idea to feel uncomfortable, too much like unquestioning submission. Which may be fraught, even painful or impossible, to those who are already working to free themselves from subservience. The tradition knows that as well as we do — just look at the story of the Exodus. When the Israelites were enslaved, they were incapable of covenant with God. Freedom was necessary first.

    Of course, freedom is necessary but not sufficient. In order to live up to our whole and holy potential, we need to be free and in relationship with God. Still, I see in the Exodus story, and its aftermath, an awareness which can shape how those who today feel disempowered or disenfranchised might approach mitzvot. The yoke of heaven is necessarily something we choose, not something thrust upon us — and a choice coerced by circumstance is no choice at all.

    One of my teachers has suggested that the word mitzvah, usually translated as “commandment,” can also be rendered “connection.” The mitzvot connect us with God, and with one another. They place us in relationship.

    Relationship with God, like relationships with one another, inevitably involves compromises. There are things I do because I want to do them, and things I do because they bring my partner joy — and cutting either category out of my life would damage both me, and us. Just so, with God. There are things I do because I perceive that they enrich my days, and there are things I do because Jewish tradition teaches they are worthwhile. Maybe the practice of doing them opens me to a new kind of transformation. And maybe choosing to take on a practice is, itself, a radical and powerful change.

    “Today we are all Jews by choice,” writes Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi. “The old understanding of being commanded was of commandments handed down the mountain, of an authority beaming down on us from above. Today any sense of commandment must come from within, from inside us. Can we feel commanded without feeling coerced?” Rabbi Marcia Prager poses a similar question: “Where, then, is the locus of the imperative once there is no commander, no coercion, once I can choose or relinquish obligations as I wish?”

    More, she asks:

    What do we do when we encounter a mitzvah we don’t understand, or that we think we do understand and therefore reject? Is the system fixed and sealed, or is it flexible and unfolding? Is it ancient wisdom or ancient prejudices? Is the authority to craft the mitzvot allocated only to a hierarchy of male legalists in a particular chain of rabbinic command, or can we approach the evolution of mitzvot in a feminist, historical, and critical way? Do we practice only the things we understand and appreciate? Can we understand and appreciate without practice?

    My answer to those last two questions is “no” — though a delicate balance is required, and a healthy respect for paradox. For many of us, in this age of chosen-Judaism, it’s hard to take on practices that don’t immediately resonate — even if we understand that some practices only resonate properly from the inside. The hardest thing may be making the leap of opening oneself to the possibility that an illogical practice can have transformative effect…and that’s a leap each of us may have to make, not once, but repeatedly over the course of a lifetime.

    Chukim (like the ritual of the red cow, and its decontaminating ashes) are the deepest level of mitzvah, and the hardest level to understand. The root of the word is one which denotes “engraved” — these are the proverbial rules carved in stone. As Reb Zalman notes:

    In order to reveal an engraved message, the medium of transmission must give up something of itself: this is what the chipping-out process of engraving entains. And the medium of transmission here is us. More than the other types of mitzvot, the chukim ask for a higher level of surrender to a will that is not our own.

    Giving up something of myself isn’t easy. Part of me rebels against it, and I have to work at discerning when that rebellion is healthy (feminism has valuable things to teach me about integrity and strength) and when it’s an old defense mechanism (Judaism has valuable things to teach me about covenant and surrender.) In the end, this isn’t an either/or — neither feminism nor Judaism requires me to choose a single lens through which to see the world. Neither is the covenant detailed in this week’s portion an either/or: mitzvot aren’t binary, a single piece of whole cloth one either embodies or rejects. Each of us is a work-in-progress, and so is each person’s relationship with mitzvot, and with power, and with God.

    And how can we relate today to the chok which begins this portion, the ritual of the red cow without blemish — no longer possible, in the absence of the Temple, and therefore ripe for revisioning in the new Jewish paradigm which we inhabit? For our ancestors, the sacrifice of a mother cow who had never been yoked offered a way to become tahor again after contact with death. What can we find in the deepest part of ourselves — the part which has never submitted to anything — to cast on the fire? What in ourselves should we burn in order to know ourselves as pure, no matter what loss or sorrow we have touched?

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  3. Wendy

    From Chabad.org

    This is the decree (chok) of the Torah… (Numbers 19:2)

    This phrase can be understood in two ways. On one level it means that this–the law of the red heifer–is the ultimate “decree,” the most supra-rational of all the Torah’s precepts. A deeper meaning is that all of Torah is, in essence, divine decree. It is only that with many of the mitzvot, the supra-rational divine will come “clothed” in garments of reason.

    (Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi)

    In reference to what did King Solomon say (Ecclesiastes 7:23), “I thought to be wise to it, but it is distant from me”? He said: “All of the Torah’s commandments I have comprehended. But the chapter of the red heifer, though I have examined it, questioned it and searched it out–I thought to be wise to it, but it is distant from me.”

    (Midrash Rabbah)
    ——————————————————————————————————–

    Speak to the children of Israel, that they bring to you a red heifer (19:2)

    The Mishneh Torah is a purely legal work. As he explains in his introduction, Maimonides included only the final rulings of Torah law, leaving out the reasoning and deliberations behind them, in order to make it a readily accessible guide to daily life for all. Also in those rare cases in which Maimonides appears to “digress” and interject a philosophical insight or some background information, upon closer examination these always prove to be a statement of law and a practical instruction on daily living.

    The same is true of the above quoted passage. At first glance, it appears to be a brief piece of history concerning the red heifer, followed by a prayerful appeal to the Almighty to send Moshiach. But Maimonides is demonstrating to us the true definition of “belief in Moshiach.” To believe in Moshiach is not just to believe that he will someday come, but to expect his coming on a daily, hourly, and momentary basis. It means that no matter what you are discussing, the subject turns to Moshiach at the slightest provocation. It means that in the midst of arranging the laws of the red heifer, a spontaneous plea erupts from the depths of your heart: “May he speedily be revealed, Amen, may it be the will of G-d!”

    (The Lubavitcher Rebbe)
    ———————————————————————————————————-

    The clean person shall sprinkle upon the unclean person… and he shall be clean at evening… [But] he that sprinkles the water of sprinkling… shall be unclean (19:19-21)

    The fact that the ashes of the heifer “purify the contaminated and contaminate the pure” carries an important lesson to us in our daily lives: If your fellow has been infected by impurity and corruption, do not hesitate to get involved and do everything within your power to rehabilitate him. If you are concerned that you may became tainted by your contact with him, remember that the Torah commands the kohen to purify his fellow Jew, even though his own level of purity will be diminished in the process.

    (The Lubavitcher Rebbe)

    —————————————————————————————————–

    And Miriam died there… And there was no water for the congregation (20:1-2)

    Three great providers arose for the people of Israel–Moses, Aaron and Miriam–through whom they received three great gifts: the well, the clouds [of glory], and the manna. The well was in the merit of Miriam, the clouds in the merit of Aaron, and the manna in the merit of Moses.

    When Miriam died, the well was removed, as it says, “And Miriam died there…” and, immediately afterward, “And there was no water for the congregation.” The well then resumed in the merit of the other two.

    When Aaron died, the clouds of glory were removed, as it says, “And the Canaanite, the King of Arad, heard …and waged war on Israel.” He heard that Aaron died, and thought that he now had license to attack Israel [because the clouds of glory which protected them were gone. The well and the clouds] then resumed in the merit of Moses alone.

    (Talmud, Taanit 9a)

    A people have various needs, and different types of leaders arise to provide them. Spiritually, too, a nation requires “food,” “air” and “water” — wisdom, faith and guidance. Again, different leaders arise to provide these different needs, each according to his or her specialty.

    But there may come a time when a leader cannot afford the luxury of “specialization.” He may be capable of teaching Torah on the highest level, but there is no one to teach the children alef-bet. He may be suited to raise the most spiritual souls to sublime heights, but there is no one to sustain the simple faith of the common man or to provide guidance on the most commonplace dilemmas of life. In such times, the true leader assumes all these tasks, as Moses did in the closing days of Israel’s sojourn in the desert, when the people stood at the threshold of the Promised Land. Miriam and Aaron were no more, and Moses served as shepherd, nurse and guardian of faith in one.

    (The Lubavitcher Rebbe)

    ——————————————————————————–

    And Miriam died there… And there was no water for the congregation (20:1-2)

    A person may ingest the ingredients of life, but these will not vitalize him without the fluids that course through his body. The food swallowed by the stomach, the oxygen drawn in by the lungs, must now be transported through the body’s canals and made to saturate its every cell.

    Therein lies the spiritual significance of Miriam’s role as Israel’s provider of “water.” Miriam first appears in the Torah (see Midrashim and commentaries on Exodus 1:15) as a children’s nurse: one who distills adult food for the consumption of a child; one who trains and educates a growing human being, filtering the stimuli of an adult world for his maturing mind; who processes the raw materials of life to meet the specific needs of her charge’s age and phase of development.

    Miriam’s well is the vital fluid of Israel’s spiritual life, the water that inculcates them with the knowledge and identity her brothers provide. The waters of Miriam transport and apply the nutrients of Torah and the abstractions of faith to each individual, on his or her particular level.

    (The Lubavitcher Rebbe)

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  4. Wendy

    ~ Rabbi Shefa Gold’s Torah Journeys ~

    Chukat

    (Rule)

    NUMBERS 19:1 – 22:1

    Chukat begins by describing one of the most mysterious rituals described in Torah – the rite of the Red Heifer. The ashes of the Red Heifer are mixed with certain specific ingredients and mixed with water to create special waters of purification. This mixture is used to purify anyone who has contact with Death.

    Chukat recounts the deaths of both Aaron and Miriam. After Miriam dies, the people are thirsty and complain to Moses. God tells Moses to speak to the rock in order to draw forth water, but instead of speaking to the rock he hits it.

    THE BLESSING

    DURING OUR TORAH JOURNEY THIS WEEK, both Miriam and Aaron will die. The Torah portion Chukat prepares us by beginning with a ritual that purifies us at those times when we come into contact with death. It is one of the most mysterious and powerful rituals of Torah. The great blessing of Chukat is the knowledge that whatever our defilement and whatever our mistakes, we can always return to our essential purity.
    Whenever I seek to learn from mistakes I have made, I look for a pattern and then try to understand the source of that pattern. It is understood by our Tradition that the quintessential mistake of our ancestors as they wandered through the wilderness was the sin of the Golden Calf. This portion begins by discussing the great ritual for purification. The first and major ingredient required for this ritual is the Red Heifer. (The heifer is a mother cow that has never been yoked.) To know the source of sin, I must lay the Red Heifer on the fires of Truth. Because she is the mother of the Golden Calf, the source for the pattern of sin, her ashes are the first ingredient that I will need for purification.

    ON THESE FIRES OF TRUTH I will also place just the right proportions of pride and humility, represented by tall Cedar and low-growing Hyssop. I will need both pride and humility in order to accomplish my journey of purification. Pride allows me to stand tall enough to see the path ahead, and humility connects me to the earth beneath my feet. The last element the Torah requires for this ritual is Crimson, my passion, which adds my own holy fire to these fires of purification. Thus, the recipe includes Insight, pride, humility and passion, mixed with living waters, the compassionate flow of Life, combining to provide the perfect alchemical formula for our renewal.
    The Golden Calf is built when we lose faith in an invisible, unnameable God who may have abandoned us to die in the wilderness. We are tempted to build a life around this Golden Calf, thereby placing something other than God-the-essential-mystery at the center of our attention. That life built around the worship of security or happiness or wealth or fame obscures the root fear of Death that has unconsciously driven us.
    When we are ready to identify our Golden Calf, then we must trace its roots to find the Red Heifer, the impetus for our own idolatry, the clue to our own pattern of sin. Then, we are able to offer up the ashes of the Red Heifer, the insight into the nature of our root fear. When death touches our lives, we can be protected from our own tendency towards fear, by the blessing of this insight. Having faced our fear, we need not live in its shadow.

    THE SPIRITUAL CHALLENGE

    CHUKAT TELLS US OF MIRIAM’S DEATH, and immediately afterward the text notes that the people are thirsty. Their thirst drains them of strength for the journey and fills them with despair. They complain to Moses and Aaron who ask God for help. God tells Miriam’s grieving brothers to speak to the rock before the assembled community, promising that it will yield water for everyone. Moses speaks sharply to the thirsty masses and then hits the rock twice instead of speaking to it.
    Miriam had a way with water. She could touch the depths with her song and call forth spiritual nourishment. No matter how difficult the journey, Miriam’s dance would bring ease and beauty to the process itself. She carried with her the feminine wisdom that could not be written down. Upon her death we are given a spiritual challenge: to reclaim the source of her wisdom, to discover the song in our voice and the dance in our step.

    MOSES WAS GIVEN THIS CHALLENGE, and he failed in order that we might learn from his mistake. Moses blamed the thirsty people for their complaint and then took credit for the life-giving power that was God’s alone. When he struck the rock twice, it did pour forth water, but it also exacted a great price. Until we learn to speak to the rock, we will be denied entrance to the Land of Promise.
    To speak to the rock means to be in conversation with the natural world; hitting it is an attempt to subjugate nature. Miriam knew the words and she knew the music that would open the deep and secret places of earth-wisdom. The spiritual challenge of Chukat is to call Miriam’s wisdom back to us, to re-open the conversation with the rock that was interrupted by Moses’ mistake.

    For Guideline for Practice please click link to website.
    http://rabbishefagold.com/Chukkat.html

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  5. Wendy

    From Melissa Carpenter

    The Guilt of Silence

    The Torah portion for the week of June 13-19 this year is Chukkat, in which immediately after the death of Miriam, the children of Israel revert to the kind of complaining the previous generation of Israelites did in the book of Exodus: that Moses brought them into the wilderness to die of hunger and thirst.

    And God spoke to Moshe, saying: “Take the staff and gather the community, you and your brother Aharon, and you (plural) shall speak to the rock (rock outcropping), before their eyes, and it will give its water. Thus you (singular) will bring forth for them water from the rock, and you (singular) will give drink to the community and their livestock.”

    And Moshe took his staff from before God, as He had commanded him. And Moshe and Aharon assembled the congregation in front of the rock, and he said to them: “Listen up, mutineers! Shall we bring forth water for you from out of this rock?” And Moshe raised his hand high and beat the rock with his staff twice. And abundant water came forth, and the community and their livestock drank.

    But God said to Moshe and to Aharon: “Because you (plural) did not trust Me, to sanctify Me in the eyes of the children of Israel, therefore you (plural) will not bring this congregation to the land that I have given to them.” (Numbers 20:7-12; Chukkat)

    God said to Moshe and to Aharon … “Aharon will be gathered to his people; for he will not enter the land that I gave to the Children of Israel, because of your (plural) mutiny against My word concerning the water of Merivah (strife).” (Numbers 20:23-24; Chukkat)

    ha-moriym = those who mutiny, rebel, obstinately disobey, are refractory, are contrary, are insubordinate

    What awful thing did Moses and Aaron do that led to God’s statement that they would die without entering the promised land?

    Commentators over the centuries has generated a number of possible reasons why Moses was punished. One of my favorites is that when Moses took the staff, he realized that the people were still as mutinous as the last time he used the staff, 40 years ago at Merivah of Horev, when God told him to strike a rock to get water. Overcome with bitterness, Moses forgot God’s orders and struck the rock as he had done near Horev, instead of using the new technology and speaking to the rock. Thus, at Merivah of Kadesh, he frustrated God’s plan to replace physical power with the power of words.

    Or perhaps Moses’ mistake was not paying close attention to God’s instructions to take the staff, but speak to the rock. Not paying attention when God is speaking is highly disrespectful.

    But why was Aaron punished? He did help Moses assemble the congregation in front of the rock, as God had instructed them. But he did not lose his temper. He did not claim to be the source of the miracle. He did not beat the rock. Yet God blames Aaron as well as Moses for not trusting God and for not sanctifying God in the eyes of the Israelites. And when the Israelites reach Mount Hor, and God announces Aaron will die there, he accuses both Moses and Aaron of mutiny, using the same word that Moses used to accuse the Israelites before he beat the rock.

    Aaron is guilty of failing to speak to the rock and failing to mention God’s name. God does ask both Moses and Aaron to speak to the rock, using the plural suffix for “you”, before switching back to the singular. But Aaron has never been asked to initiate a miracle before. How can he be blamed for letting the great prophet Moses take the lead, as usual?

    Apparently God blames him for his silence. This is ironic, since God first recruited Aaron as a spokesperson for Moses. But after they cross the Reed Sea, Aaron speaks only for himself. The last time he speaks in the Torah is when he pleads with Moses to intercede with God to heal their sister Miriam (Numbers 12:11-12). Aaron does not speak again, even when God announces his immanent death.

    Yet God apparently expects Aaron, as well as Moses, to speak to the rock and to give God credit for the miracle. And even if Aaron does not have time to speak to the rock before Moses hits it, he still could speak up afterward to attribute the miracle to God. Aaron dies outside the promised land because he remained silent.

    In my own life, I often wonder when to speak up and when to be silent, particularly when someone in authority makes a mistake. This Torah portion demonstrates that if you know with certainty what is correct (as Aaron does, because he heard God’s instructions), then you must speak up. But how and when to speak is not always so clear.

    May all of us who witness a fellow person’s mistake be blessed with the ability to know when the situation is so urgent and important we must speak immediately, in public; when it is better to wait and speak in private or at another time; and when it is better to be silent.

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  6. Wendy

    UNIVERSAL TORAH: CHUKAS

    By Rabbi Avraham Greenbaum

    Torah Reading: CHUKAS, Numbers 19:1-22:1. Haftara: Judges 11:1-33.

    THE BEGINNING OF THE END

    Now that we have passed the summer solstice, the days are still long but
    imperceptibly they are starting to get shorter, as we move inexorably closer to
    the end of the year and the coming New Year and Days of Awe. The Hebrew letters
    of the present month, Tammuz, are the initial letters of the phrase Z-MAN
    T-ESHUVAH M-MASHMESH U-VA, “the Time of Teshuvah is getting closer”. The letters
    of next month, AV, are the initial letters of ELUL BA – “Elul (month of
    repentance) is on the way”. After the month of Av comes Elul itself, and soon
    afterwards, Rosh HaShanah, Simchas Torah and the conclusion of the annual
    reading of the Torah.

    In the previous parshah, KORACH, we passed the mid-point of the book of Numbers
    (Numbers 17:20). Korach’s conspiracy is not explicitly dated in the Torah
    narrative, but is considered to have taken place early on during the wanderings
    of the Children of Israel in the wilderness. The Torah passes over the 38 years
    of wandering after the sin of the Spies in almost complete silence — except for
    a list given later on of the stopping points on the journey, Numbers ch. 33,
    parshas MAS’EI. In our present parshah of CHUKAS, we move almost imperceptibly
    from the initial period in the wilderness following the Exodus and the Giving of
    the Torah, right to the end of the 40 years of wandering and the first stages of
    the conquest of the Land of Israel.

    Parshas CHUKAS begins with the commandment of burning the Red Heiffer and using
    its ashes for purification from defilement from the dead. This commandment was
    among the first given to the Children of Israel directly after the Exodus and
    the Crossing of the Red Sea (Exodus 15:25, see Rashi there). The section about
    the Red Heiffer as we have it in CHUKAS (Numbers ch. 19) is also listed in the
    Midrash (Sifra) as one of those given to Moses on the 1st Nissan one year after
    the Exodus, the day the on which the Sanctuary was erected.

    The positioning of the section of the Red Heiffer here — as we move into the
    latter part of the book of Numbers and on towards the end of the Torah — is
    bound up with its thematic relationship with other sections of our parshah. The
    commandment of the Red Heiffer, which comes to purify from defilement from
    contact with the dead, is followed immediately by the narrative of the death of
    Miriam. (“The death of Tzaddikim atones like the sacrifices” — Rashi on Numbers
    20:1). The death of Miriam took place in the last year of wandering in the
    wilderness, on the 10th Nissan, exactly a year before the crossing of the Jordan
    and the entry into the Land. This is the first clue to dating the events in this
    parshah. The ensuing lack of water in the wilderness caused Moses and Aaron to
    strike the rock, leading to the decree that they would not enter the Land but
    die in the wilderness. Moses takes Aaron up Mount Hor to die, while Elazar, his
    son succeeds him as High Priest. We suddenly have to confront the loss of the
    elders and leaders of the generation. How do we deal with death?

    Without our even noticing the transition, the older generation are leaving one
    by one, having been replaced by a whole new generation. The new generation —
    who are actually the old generation in new bodies — are now moving inexorably
    forward to the end and the goal – the Land of Israel. The Generation of the
    Wilderness have passed on, and the Generation of the Conquest now begin their
    advance.

    As the Torah directs our eyes to the end goal of the wandering in the wilderness
    — entry into the Land to fulfill the Torah there — it first focuses our eyes
    upon the end goal of man, which is death: “This is the Torah: when a man dies.”
    (Numbers 19:14). For unless we come to terms with death, we cannot truly live.
    Death is a fact, perhaps the main fact, of life. We are forced to confront it at
    some time or another. In order to come to terms with it, we have to learn how to
    look at it.

    Thus parshas CHUKAS takes its place in the series of parshas read during the
    bright summer months of Tammuz, time of Teshuvah, that teach us how to look at
    various different aspects of life in the correct perspective. BEHAALOSCHAH
    taught about the purity of vision in general. SHELACH LECHA taught about viewing
    the world — and our own selves — with the eyes of faith despite outward
    appearances. KORACH taught about how we look at others who may be better than
    ourselves. CHUKAS now comes to teach us how to look at our mortality, death, the
    end goal of life, in the right perspective — for with the right perspective, we
    can transcend death.

    Today, only a decade after we were promised a new order of peace, the world has
    been plunged before our eyes into an era of global war. Every day we are
    bombarded with gruesome and horrific images of bloodied, burned, mutilated
    bodies. It has long ceased to be surprising to hear of new daily outrages in
    locations far and near. We are hardly aware of how dulled our sensitivities have
    become to injury, death and suffering. If we were to start weeping as we should,
    would we have enough tears for all the suffering in the world?

    Rabbi Nachman of Breslov teaches that the only way we can transcend suffering is
    by trying to focus our vision on the faraway, ultimate goal of the entire
    creation, which is surely completely good. Rabbi Nachman says we must even close
    our eyes to this world — close them tight — so as to keep focussed on this
    ultimate, transcendent goal, which is to bring the entire universe to perfect
    unity and completeness through G-d’s hidden guidance and providence. (Likutey
    Moharan 1:65 “Garden of the Souls”.)

    While no-one can fathom the depths of meaning of the Red Heiffer — any more
    than we can fathom the real meaning of death and of life — we are free to
    search for hints of meaning in this fascinating commandment, which is the key to
    complete redemption. This depends upon the restoration of the ashes of the Red
    Heiffer, because only when we are able to be purified from impurity from contact
    with the dead can we go up to the Temple, source of LIFE, and carry out all its
    rituals in the proper way.

    What causes defilement from contact with the dead is not the soul of the dead
    person. It is the physical remains of his or her body. The death and
    decomposition of the body are very repugnant: they threaten us, both as health
    hazards and because they undermine our pride and dignity as living human beings.
    They remind us of our mortality — “You are earth, and to the earth you will
    return” — but we cannot live with such intense awareness of the vanity of the
    physical world. We are commanded to cover the body, bury it in the earth, put it
    out of sight. We should not pre-occupy ourselves with the dead (as did the
    Egyptians). Our job is to keep living, to keep marching to the end goal — “the
    Land of Israel”.

    Thus the priest (son of Aharon, signifying light and vision) takes the pure Red
    Heiffer — its redness signifying the harshness of DIN, Strict Judgment, and
    GEVURAH, Might. The priest sheds the heiffer’s blood — breaking its power. The
    priest gazes towards the the Holy of Holies and sprinkles the blood of the
    heiffer towards it. This sprinkling of the blood of the Red Heiffer towards the
    Holy of Holies was integral to the whole ceremony, which was performed on the
    Mount of Olives at a spot directly aligned towards the gates of the Temple. The
    body of the heiffer was then burned on a woodpile and minute quantities of its
    ashes were mixed with water from a living source to be sprinkled with hyssop on
    people and utensils that had become defiled.

    In breaking the power of Strict DIN, the priest had to look towards the Holy of
    Holies, because this is the ultimate goal of all creation, the place of complete
    unit, peace and perfection. Defilement from the dead is very depressing. (The
    chapters on this subject in Rambam’s Mishneh Torah can also be somewhat
    depressing, as they deal in detail with different parts of the body in varying
    stages of decomposition, etc.) In order to live we cannot occupy ourselves with
    death. We must be aware of our mortality, but we must separate ourselves from
    physical death. The souls of the dead go on living on their plane, and so must
    we on ours. The seven days of purification from defilement with the dead are
    seven days of separation from what ought to be the abnormal — the decaying dead
    body, which has to be buried and put away — in order to return to the Land of
    the Living. It is necessary to be sprinkled with the ashes of the Red Heiffer on
    the third and seventh days of the week in order to draw renewed strength by
    repeatedly looking toward the Holy of Holies.

    Like the priest breaking the force of severe DIN by gazing towards the Holy of
    Holies, we too, in order to keep living, must keep our gaze focussed on the Holy
    of Holies. The Holy of Holies in our lives should be our times of prayer and
    Torah study, and, in the family context, quality time with our dear ones and
    especially spouses. These are the best support through all the vicissitudes of
    life.

    * * *

    “ARISE, O WELL.” (Numbers 21:17)

    The living waters with which the ashes of the Red Heiffer are mixed are one of
    several references to water in our parshah. Notable among the other references
    are the “Waters of Strife” — the waters that Moses and Aaron extracted from the
    Rock, which cost them the privilege of leading the Children of Israel into the
    Promised Land. This section of the Torah is of course no less profound than the
    preceding section about the Red Heiffer. Rabbi Nachman saw his explanation of
    Moses’ striking the rock (Likutey Moharan I:20) as being the key to all of his
    Torah discourses. The bare essence of Rabbi Nachman’s teaching is that even the
    saintly Moses should not have sought “water” — Torah insight and inspiration —
    “by force”, i.e. in the merit of his good deeds, his “rod”, as a “right”.
    Rather, he should have wept and begged for the waters of Torah as a gift,
    through prayer. Thus Moses had to atone for his error with the 515 prayers that
    he offered in the hope of entering the Land of Israel.

    It was the death of Miriam that led to the lack of water which made Moses strike
    the rock. For throughout the forty years of wandering, a miraculous well
    accompanied the Israelites in the merit of Miriam. Miriam (having the
    connotation of bitterness) symbolizes the soul of the suffering true Torah
    scholar (“eat bread with salt, drink water by measure”) through whose merit
    Torah insight comes into the world to inspire the generation. When this soul
    departs the world, there is a terrible thirst for water, with no one having the
    power to enlighten and inspire. Each generation needs to dig for the waters of
    the Torah anew.

    The history of Miriam’s well is not written explicitly in the Torah text but
    only allusively. The allusions are brought out in the Aramaic Targum and in
    Midrashim brought by Rashi on certain verses in our parshah — such as Numbers
    20:10-11 and 21:15ff. This well of the waters of inspiration accompanied the
    Israelites on all their journeys in the wilderness and provided water for the
    camp at each of their stopping places. When Miriam died, it disappeared, but it
    returned in the merit of Moses and traveled with the Israelites on the last
    stages of their journey through the wilderness. When they entered the Land under
    Joshua (on 10 Nissan, anniversary of the death of Miriam), the well also entered
    the land. It traveled to the Kinneret (Sea of Gallilee), where it is said to be
    visible from mountains to the east as a kind of “sieve” on the surface of the
    sea. From the depths of the Kinneret, the well is said to feed the waters of
    Israel’s most important water reserve. (The ARI is said to have taken R. Chayim
    Vital on a boat and given him a cup of this water to drink, after which R.
    Chayim Vital understood the teachings of his master.)

    The final stages of the journey of the Israelites through the wilderness and the
    first stages in the conquest of the Land of Israel are recounted in our parshah.
    Their geography is somewhat obscure to many, as they took place in what is today
    the kingdom of Jordan, which for political reasons remains temporarily out of
    bounds for Torah lovers. The Israelites were headed to ARVOS MO’AV, the “plains
    of Moab” east of the River Jordan facing Jericho. There they assembled prior to
    the entry into the Land in order to hear the final discourses of Moses, which
    make up the book of Deuteronomy.

    Our present parshah describes their journey there. From the wilderness, they
    advanced around Edom (S.E. of Yam HaMelach, the “Dead” Sea) and Moab (to the
    east of the southern part of Yam Hamelach), crossing the River Arnon, which
    flows into the Yam HaMelach from the east, midway from north to south. The
    Arnon, which meets the sea via a spectacular mountain gorge, is the boundary
    between Moav, which the Israelites were forbidden to conquer, and the
    territories to the north, which had been conquered by the Emorites. The
    narrative of the Israelite conquest of the latter territories begins in our
    parshah.

    The parshah relates that the miracles of the crossing of the Arnon were
    comparable with the miracles of the crossing of the Red Sea (Numbers 21:14ff.).
    The Emorites were waiting for the Israelites in caves in the gorge below, but
    the two sides of the gorge miraculously came together, allowing the Israelites
    to walk safely above. The Well of Miriam, which traveled with the Israelites,
    flushed the blood of the dead Emorites out of the gorge so that the Israelites
    could see the miracles performed for them.

    Thus, forty years after the Generation of the Exodus had sung to G-d when they
    came up from the Red Sea, the Generation of the Conquest sang again as they
    witnessed the first miracles of the conquest. “That was the well of which HaShem
    said to Moses, gather the people and I will give them water. Then Israel sang
    (lit. WILL SING) this song: Arise, O well.!” (Numbers 21:16-17).

    The conquest of the Land depends upon Miriam’s well — the well of Torah insight
    and inspiration. May we soon hear the song of the conquest of the Land for the
    Torah, for the Holy of Holies and for the glory of HaShem — quickly in our
    days!

    Shabbat Shalom!!!

    Avraham Yehoshua Greenbaum

    Reply
  7. Aryae Post author

    Reb Miles Krassen/ Moshe Aharon

    Parshat Chukat is a very important parsha as it has one of the deepest teachings in the entire Torah. In fact, it begins “va-yedabber HaVaYaH el Moshe ve-el Aharon leimor,” “the Divine Guidance spoke to Moses and Aaron and said, Chukat ha-Torah. This is basically the way the Torah works, this is the almost incomprehensible law of the Torah.” And then the Torah tells us that basically Moshe received this teaching, that is to say, he received the Divine Command to deliver this teaching. And what is the teaching? It’s a teaching of the red heifer, the parah adumah. And what Moshe is supposed to tell us is that we should work with this parah adumah, a red heifer that is temimah, it is absolutely perfect, it’s immaculate. The rest of the verse tells us it doesn’t have any flaw in it, because it was never used for anything, it never bore any burden, it was never under the yoke.

    The Kozhenitzer maggid, a great hasidic rebbe, has a teaching wherein he reads the verse and divides it into two. First of all, he says that there are two things here, one is the parah adumah, itself, which is perfect. And the other is asher ayn bo mum, meaning anyone who says they don’t have any flaws has never borne the yoke of Torah. In other words, anyone who thinks this way hasn’t even begun spiritual work. So, what’s the connection between the two? Moshe is instructed to tell us that we should take and make use of this “sacred cow,” this red heifer that is absolutely perfect, but also warns us that any person who would see themselves as lacking any flaw has never done any spiritual work at all.

    The basic principle of our cosmology is that everything is in a process of being fixed. So, what’s implied here is that the basic condition of the world is full of flaws that need to be perfected and the red heifer represents something that’s immaculate which we need in order to fix something. And so the question is, “what does that which is flawless fix?” And, the answer is that it fixes the damage of the golden calf.

    The parah, the heifer, is the mother cow, and the eglah, the calf, is the immature offspring that goes astray. The result of the golden calf is the breaking of the first tablets. Because Moshe Rabbeinu comes down with the first tablets, the first version—which is actually the higher Torah—and sees that the people don’t—can’t—handle the higher Torah because their level of understanding of reality isn’t high enough so they can’t really get what Moshe Rabbeinu is in touch with. So, they turn to this unevolved representation, which is the golden calf, something they can relate to, and as a result Moshe Rabbeinu feels this sort of righteous anger as an example that there can be a sort of anger that is righteous. He winds up breaking the first tablets, and the result is that we then get the second tablets. Basically, we have here the teaching about two levels of Torah. One is, so to speak, about the original and future Torah, which is beyond our grasp. It is beyond our level, the level of present consciousness. The other is the Torah that fits our present level of consciousness. But even though we (only) have before us a Torah that fits our present level of consciousness, we have the experience and memory of a Torah that is higher, and that is actually the Torah that we’re meant to get. It’s that ‘higher Torah’ G-D really gave Moshe Rabbeinu to bring down, but we couldn’t handle it. So, we need something to fix the fact that we can’t handle the higher Torah, which we can understand as the Torah of the future.

    So the Torah that is broken by Moshe Rabbeinu, because we didn’t have the vessels to receive it is nevertheless the Torah we talk about when we talk about the light of the future, which is already here but we still don’t have the chops for it, the kelim or the vessels to really hold it. So the fix that we need to make is represented by this red heifer, which is flawless.

    Now, what is the red heifer which is flawless? It’s the level of consciousness which gets ayn od milvado, there is really nothing but G-D. That consciousness actually fixes the level of the flaw that comes from the golden calf. Since we couldn’t get that higher level, we needed a lesser representation. The attitude, or consciousness, that was flawed at the time of the golden calf was something like, ‘well, G-D must be like this, or G-D must be like that, but it’s not this and it’s not that!’ As if “It” were something limited: limited, specific, and limiting! So the fix is the consciousness of the red heifer, which is perfect without any qualification. It has and is absolutely everything. This ‘perfection,’ is the consciousness that recognizes that everything is G-D.

    But the specific teaching that we have relating to the red heifer is a paradox. The paradox is that it purifies anything that is impure and it makes impure anything that is pure. So, what is the meaning of this? The meaning is, if a person tries to make the fix of the red heifer, to fix the problem of the golden calf, then they reach the level of the consciousness that everything is G-D. Now that’s the level of red heifer! But, paradoxically, that consciousness that recognizes that everything is G-D can either make the impure pure or it can make the pure impure. In other words, if we are aware of the limitations of our ordinary “golden calf” consciousness, the “red heifer consciousness” fixes us.  But, on the other hand, when we get an insight into the level where everything is G-D, the risk is we’ll say, ‘therefore we have nothing to do because everything is G-D and the world is just happening and doesn’t need our efforts to evolve.’ If we draw the conclusion that everything is perfect and we have nothing to do, then that’s like what the Kozhenitzer maggid says, “if you’re saying I have no mum, I have no flaw, then you haven’t done any spiritual work at all.” Then the red heifer fixes you in a different way.  It throws you down to the fact that you still need to do something to further evolve. So, the only way the red heifer can really fix us is if, when we reach the consciousness where everything is G-D, we paradoxically recognize as well that we still have plenty of work to do.

    So, the fix of the parah adumah, the red heifer, is that when we encounter the consciousness that is ayn od milvado, that there is nothing else but G-D, it stirs in us this great longing inside to reach higher levels in terms of what’s possible for us to attain within our own levels of spiritual work.

    Reply
  8. Wendy

    From Rabbi Rachel Barenblat
    WATER FROM THE ROCK (CHUKKAT) 2009

    When Miriam died there was no water
    the wadis dried up the springs didn’t flow

    as though the desert were mourning her passing
    her living waters blocked by stone

    we thirsted for wisdom we drank salt tears
    we ripped our robes and wailed for the Black Land

    all Moshe could imagine was striking the rock
    the water he called forth was chalky and tasteless

    not like Miriam’s melodies not like her dance
    when our feet wove grapevines and our hearts were bells

    Reply
  9. Wendy

    From Rabbi Jill Hammer
    I love this teaching about the death of Miriam and about Miriam’s well from Rabbi Jill Hammer in her book, The Jewish Book of Days.

    “… In the Torah, just after Miriam dies, the people complain they have no water to drink. Rabbinic interpreters conclude the well dried up when Miriam died.(Song of Songs Rabbah 4:14). Only after Moses goes into the wilderness to search for it does the well reappear.

    But the well is not gone. The Babylonian Talmud ( Shabbat 35a) tells us the well can be found to this day in the waters of the Sea of Galilee. The Shulchan Arukh ( Orach Cayyim 299:10) teaches that every Saturday night Miriam’s well moves through all the waters of the world, bringing healing to those who are ill and suffering.In modern times, some place a cup of fresh water on the seder table in honor of Miriam.”

    Reply
  10. Wendy

    From Rabbi James Stone Goodman
    Sustain 2011

    We were discussing the mystery rule of Torah
    the mystery mitzvah as it were if it were understood
    we might understand
    it all –

    The chok of the little red cow –
    how what purifies can corrupt
    what corrupts might purify.

    We came to rest in a place none of us imagined before
    we began with a sense of redemption through learning
    through guidebook Torah in a way suggested by
    the Sefas Emes that applied to us more
    than to the text itself.

    Every soul has a portion
    in the Torah
    a dot
    or a point
    that is
    incorruptable.

    At that moment we had become a letter of the guidebook
    a dot a vowel a dia-critical a mark on the page
    we became a letter of the text
    we arrived at a-symmetry.

    We came to the death of Miryam
    how she died –
    by the kiss of God
    God inhaled her soul so to speak
    Moses and Miryam both
    with a kiss.

    They died sensually
    inhaled into God’s breath through the Divine kiss
    n’shikat Hashem
    from God’s perspective they were taken by the heart like
    a lover.

    What can we make now of the frustrations of their lives
    or our lives for that matter?
    How frustrating at the end to have been
    loved into death this way –

    God breathed life into Adam [Gen.2:7]
    God inhaled Miryam’s soul.

    What’s not integrated, what’s left undone in the story now
    from God’s perspective
    how could they have passed with more intimacy and gentleness
    than with this holy kiss
    through which they returned to one being with God?

    With the death of Miryam following on the heels
    of the mystery rule of the guidebook
    the mystery paradox of the ritual of purification
    the very preparation defiles
    followed by the death of Miryam
    the removal of the well that followed us
    forty years Wilderness wandering
    with the death of Miryam as she was inhaled into the mouth of God
    do we mourn the absence of sustenance now?
    The water that followed us the well that accompanied us
    And the Wilderness the Wilderness?

    The well gone
    we are moving over the threshold without sustenance
    the a-symmetry of the various stories that settled
    not into harmony, not logical these stories
    not entirely mysteries either
    a-symmetrical, they do not converge
    we will not figure them
    they will not unlock the secrets of the guidebook for us.

    The category of recoverable wisdom
    gone for a moment
    undeciphered for now
    but known in night vision
    a future
    at night you understand them you do
    at night you know what it is
    not to penetrate this secret
    it will not unravel
    not entirely mysterious either.

    We are always waiting
    for that recoverable wisdom
    the elders all of them
    may return to us someday
    to carry the sacred load throughout our lives
    so we remember them
    the bearers of recoverable wisdom –

    Sustaining like Miryam’s well of water
    Like the water
    Like Miryam herself.

    jsg, usa

    O holy Shabbes Chukkat
    Maqam Hoseini
    D [1/2] E flat [1] F [1] G

    Every portion has a musical figure,
    A maqam
    Arabic cognate to maqom
    Signifying Place.

    Reply
  11. Wendy

    From Melissa Carpenter
    Chukkat: Blood and Ash
    June 24, 2011

    The Torah portion that Jews begin reading this Saturday afternoon is Chukkat, “Decree”. The portion opens with God’s decree about using the ashes of a perfect red cow (or red heifer) after being exposed to death. For centuries, rabbis have used this decree as the prime example of a law given by God that humans cannot understand, but must merely accept.

    Nevertheless, some parts of the decree of the red cow make sense in terms of human psychology.

    Speak to the children of Israel, and they shall take to you a completely blood-red cow that has no blemish in her, that never had a yoke put upon her. (Numbers/ Bemidbar 19:2)

    The Torah continues with instructions for slaughtering the cow outside the camp but within view of the sanctuary entrance, and then burning it down to ashes, along with cedar, hyssop, and red yarn. This ash must be preserved in a safe place outside the camp. When someone needs spiritual decontamination after being in the presence of a corpse, some of the ash is mixed with “living water” and sprinkled on the affected person. Only after being sprinkled can that person engage in religious life again.

    Anyone who touches a corpse, anyone with a human soul who is destined to die, who does not clear himself of guilt, will contaminate the dwelling-place of God. And that soul will be cut off from Israel, because if the water of exclusion was not sprinkled upon him, he will be contaminated; his contamination will always be with him. (Numbers 19:13)

    nefesh = soul (the soul that animates a body); throat, appetite

    tamei = contaminated, ritually unclean or impure, unacceptable for public worship

    The Torah adds that this rule applies not only to touching a corpse, but also to touching a human bone or a grave, or merely entering a tent where someone has just died.

    A few days ago, I was “touched” by a moving story my friend told about her stillborn grandson. Then I walked into a Torah study class, without any ritual in between. Usually I approach any Torah text as an exciting challenge, and I look forward to wrestling meaning out of it. This time, the Torah seemed dull and lifeless to me. It took a while for my mind to recover so I could engage with the Torah.

    Witnessing a death, or touching a corpse, is far more “contaminating” than hearing a story about it. Actual contact with death requires a far greater shift in consciousness to return to the activities of life. The Torah classifies entering “the dwelling-place of God” as an activity of life.

    Over and over again, the Torah insists that the god of the Israelites can only be worshiped when one is tahor (uncontaminated, ritually pure; the opposite of tamei). That means we cannot approach the divine when we are still in touch with death. The contrast with ancient Egyptian religion’s focus on death is probably intentional.

    (I’ve read that some Christians who meditate on an image of Jesus on the cross find God by focusing first on death, and then on its miraculous transformation. That would be a third kind of relationship between religion and death. I’m often amazed by the different deeply-held human beliefs about both God and death.)

    Let’s return to the Torah portion. How would the unique ritual of the ashes of the red cow help someone to make the shift in consciousness from death to life?

    On one level, it is significant that the cow is completely red— and the word used for red here is adumah, related to adam, “human”, adamah, “earth”, and dam, “blood”. The other ingredients the priest throws into the fire when the cow is burned are also reminders of blood: red cedar-wood, hyssop branches (used in other rituals for sprinkling with blood), and red yarn. All these things are part of the ash. When it’s time to sprinkle someone, a little of the ash is mixed with “living water”, water from a source such as a spring, rather than a well.

    The next book of the Torah, Deuteronomy/ Devarim, says “the blood is the nefesh”, the soul which makes a body alive. To me, the ritual of the red cow seems to move from life (represented by blood) to death (represented by ashes). Then death is mixed back into life (represented by living water), and the mixture is sprinkled on a living person who was contaminated by contact with death.

    Traditional commentary sees the red cow as representing a human being’s animal nature, which inevitably dies. But, the rabbis say, humans are a mixture of animal and divine natures, so we must not let an awareness of physical death make us believe we are no more than animals.

    The 19th-century rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch wrote that sacrificing the red cow means renouncing our selfish egocentrism, so we can serve God with a pure soul. Brooding on death gives someone a divided heart; we cannot embrace our moral freedom and sense of eternity when we focus too much on our animal life, which ends in death. Being sprinkled with a mixture of ashes and living water reminds the person touched by death that life still runs through all human experience, in this world and the world to come.

    We don’t have ashes from a perfectly red cow anymore (although there is a literal-minded orthodox group in Israel that’s working on getting some). So what can we do now to return to life and God after being touched by death? I suspect that in our highly individualistic culture, we each need to find our own way to return. For me, a return might begin with a very long walk, with all my senses open to receive, gradually, the wonder of creation. For you, it might begin another way. If the contact with death is the passing of someone you love, or news of your own final illness, it might take a long time to finish shifting your consciousness.

    But I believe that somehow, we all need to find a way to return—so that we can truly live for as long as we are alive.

    Reply
  12. Wendy

    From Rabbis Arthur Waskow and Phyllis Berman 2001

    Hukkat
    Red Cow, Red Blood, Red Dye:
    Staring Death & Life in the Face

    By Rabbi Arthur Waskow and Rabbi Phyllis Berman

    The Torah-portion Hukkat (Num. 19 through 21) calls our attention to what looks at first like paradox.

    Literally “looks,” for the paradoxes appear before the eyes.

    First we are told that in order to restore to the community those who have become tamei by contact with death, a red heifer is slaughtered and burned in red fire with red wood and red dye in a great cloud of red smoke for / before the eyes of the priest (Num. 19: 5).

    What is “tumah?” Not impurity, as it is usually translated, but a spiritual state of laser-beam inward focus (quite different from experiencing holiness in community). Tumah might well result from giving birth, touching death, menstruating, having sex. For people so touched to move back into community, they had to go through one or another ritual. For death-contact, the red cow was the relevant ritual.

    The burning cow becomes a spectacle, literally, of redness for the priest to stare at hard. Look hard at all this red, then quickly shut your eyes: You will see a flash of green, a field of green. Green grass, green growth, green Tree of Life, green Garden.

    If you look intently upon the color of death — and then, but not till then, you release yourself from that gaze by blinking — you will live.

    Then the ashes of the burnt heifer are mixed with water, to sprinkle over anyone who has touched the dead body of any human being. This sprinkling takes away the tumah of that touch, and it must be done before such a person can enter the Temple area – the site of communal holiness.

    But the priest who kills the heifer and the one who burns her body and even the one who gathers up her ashes are all made tamei by the process. They must be ritually released from their narrow focus.

    Gazing on death opens up the spirit from its laser-beam focus on death, but the process of this opening itself narrows the focus of the practitioner. Is this a paradox? Only if we are puzzled by the flow of life/death/ life. Today many physicians and psychotherapists who heal the wounded may themselves take on the woundedness; would that we shaped a ritual to heal these healers!

    Later in the portion (Num. 20: 8), when the people are athirst God tells Moses to speak to a rock so that, for/ before the eyes of the people, it will turn to water. If they stare hard at hardness, dryness, deadliness, unchangeableness, it will turn to flow, to giving life.

    And finally (Num. 21: 4-9) , God tells Moses to cure the people of a plague of fiery snakes. How? By raising before them a nahash n’hoshet for them to stare at. What does this Hebrew phrase mean? According to the dictionary, a brass or copper serpent. But if we listen to the sound of the words, we might hear “a copper copperhead,” “a serpenty serpent, a “super-serpent.” (Everett Fox’s brilliant translation of the Torah says, “copper viper.”)

    What cures us from serpents? The cure is a serpent that we call forth for ourselves , even more deeply “serpenty” in its essence than the deadly living snakes.

    And what do you do with these super-serpents? Look hard into their faces. Stare hard at death, the face of fear, and you will be freed to life.

    Stare hard at death — and blink. Shut your eyes tight. Stare, and stop staring. Once you have seen clearly, open your eyes anew by first closing them for just an instant. — Open them! — to a different possibility. Then the colors of life will appear.

    And for us, we who still shudder from our brush with death in Auschwitz, our brush with death in the H-Bomb doomsday system, our continuing brush with death in the scorching of the earth we are bringing on ourselves, our brushes with death in the cancers of our friends and lovers, what does this mean?

    For us who choke on the dryness of our lives, us who fear the burning serpents that writhe their way into our very souls, what does this mean?

    Stare these dangers in the face before we blink. Look — and do not be addicted to the looking. Without looking, no gift of life. But to be mesmerized by the looking is also to reject the gift of life.

    Reply
  13. Wendy

    From Rav DovBer Pinson

    B”H
    Week’s Energy for Parshas Chukas

    Re-Entering Life
    Rav DovBer Pinson
    In this week’s Torah reading, Miriam and Aaron, sister and brother of Moshe, pass on. The Torah then speaks of the Tuma/impurity of death and the ritual purification of the Parah Adumah/ Red Heifer for those who have come in contact with death.
    The Torah reading opens with the words; “Hashem spoke to Moshe… take a perfectly red unblemished heifer… slaughter it… The heifer shall then be burned…Anyone who touches a human corpse shall become impure…(if) he does not purify himself, he has defiled the Temple…Take for that impure person from the ashes of the burnt offering (the red heifer) and it shall be placed in a vessel with spring water…take the hyssop and dip it into the water and sprinkle it on him…”(19:1-18)
    This, in short, is the ritual of purifying a person who has become impure through contact with a corpse. There is a sprinkling with a solution of the red heifer ashes and spring water on specific days, followed by immersion in a ritual pool of water.
    Tahara/ Purity and Tuma /impurity are intrinsically related to the life/death cycle, and are clearly unrelated to personal hygiene or disease. Tuma is connected to all forms of “death” and the mortality of life, both literally and figuratively. Conversely, Tahara is connected to “life,” both literally and figuratively, and immortal forces of life, such as the Temple and spring water.
    Life is movement and possibility. Death is an ‘end’, a state of stagnation.
    In death, at least in the physical realm, there is a stopping, a ceasing of hope, a cessation of movement and possibility. To be impure implies a connection with a ‘hopelessness’ consciousness. Purity, on the other hand, is all that is related with life, fluidity and newness, and all that stems from a place of possibility and hope.
    The Beis HaMikdash/ Temple functioned as a place of Hischadshus/Renewal. It served as a space in which one could recapture a sense of awe in creation and the Creator. To enter the Temple, one had to be ritually pure, vested with life and possibility.
    Every moment in creation is brand new, freshly born, from Ayin/pure potential, no-thing-ness to Yesh/existence.
    Each breath, a new Divine enlivening force enters, and is exhaled into creation.
    The Temple, being the epicenter of all space, is the place in which this renewal spirit is realized. As a demonstration of this reality, the Showbreads never grew stale, the bread in the temple always tasted completely fresh even if baked a week before.(Chagigah 26b). Everything of the Temple was fresh and new.
    The Temple in Jerusalem was built upon the site on which Yaakov/Jacob once slept and dreamed of the ladder and angels. (Bereishis. 28:12-18). When he awoke from this dream, he proclaimed, “Surely Hashem is in this place; and I knew it not.” If Yaakov had been aware of the holiness and purity of the place on which he stood, he would not have been able to sleep. Sleep is a minor form of death, static, stagnant – Yaakov was troubled that he had not tapped into the renewal spirit of the place and was able to go into a space of ‘death.’
    Though the ultimate mystery and paradoxical nature of the Red Heifer is beyond our comprehension (Midrash Rabba, 19:3) the specific symbolism is very pronounced. Ashes and water are mixed and sprinkled. When ashes and water mix it creates a form of soap, a cleansing, but there is something deeper occurring. Water is fluidity and life, pure and renewed.
    Water is the primordial state of creation, when creation exists in the cosmic womb as pure potential. Ashes represent the end of an old and the potential of a new, the dust returns to dust and thus a new cycle of life begins.
    There is Afar/earth and there is Eifar/ dust or ash. (Bereishis, 18:27) Earth represents the Ayin/ no-thing-ness of the Yesh/ existence, as the earth contains the potential of vegetation, yet, Eifer/ash is the deeper Ayin, the Ayin that is relatively beyond Yesh, pure potential. The ritual sprinkling of ash and water reconnects us with the cycle of life and potential of the new.
    With all this symbolism and ritual though, it is imperative that we remember, in the words of our Sages “The corpse does not defile, nor does the water purify, rather it is a Mitzvah of the King of Kings.”
    Ultimately, it is our connection to Hashem, the source of all Reality, of all Life, the One who brings death to the living and brings the dead to life that offers us renewal, hope and thus Tahara, a fresh breath of life.
    The Energy of the Week:
    Re-Entering Life
    To live in this world is to be touched continuously by both life and death.
    All people experience some form of death within their lifetimes, unfortunately it is often tragic and heartbreaking.
    Sometimes it is a symbolic death, an ending.
    In either sense, death can seem a hopeless ending, a place that is cut off from all possibility of growth.
    The energy of the Torah reading this week is the infusion of openness and newness into a place of hopelessness.
    Just as ashes return to the earth and begin a life cycle anew, the ashes of the red heifer mix with the water to create a state of purity and life, allowing those who have been in contact with death to find new breath and life in their future.
    To move forward from a place of Tuma, we must first immerse in water – fully enveloping ourselves in our primordial state, and reconnecting with the unity of Hashem, source of all – both life and death. From this place of oneness we can find our innate breath and source of life and move forward into life and hope.
    This week become aware of how a death, real or symbolic, may be holding you back from life.
    This can even be a holding on to a perception, or a way of being, that can be preventing you from growth and forward movement.
    Be open to newness of ideas, and new ways of approaching the old ideas.
    Come back to your life with an open mind, an open heart and the constant possibility of forward movement.

    Reply
  14. Wendy

    From Rabbi Laura Duhan Kaplan

    Waters of Change (5773/2013)

    At the beginning of creation, Torah says, God’s spirit hovers over the water. When Yaakov is overcome with fear of meeting his estranged brother, he crosses the Yabbok stream. On its far bank, he wrestles with a stranger, and receives a new identity. When the Israelites leave Egypt, they cross the Sea of Reeds.

    After popular leaders Miriam and Aharon die, the people confront Moshe, fearing he has deliberately led them to the wilderness to die of thirst. After snakes bite them into awareness, they apologize to Moshe and to God. Torah then reports: They camped along the Zered brook, and on the other side of the Arnon river. From there, to the well. Then Israel sang this song, “Rise up, O well, respond to this song!” (Bamidbar-Numbers 21:12-17)

    Traditional commentators wonder: Why does Torah break to describe their travels – the same travels that are listed elsewhere? Why do they travel along water? What is the significance of the song?

    Or Hachayyim says, For the first time, they travel on their own, no longer led by the Divine cloud that used to rest on the sanctuary while Aharon was alive. Ramban says: The travels are listed specifically to emphasize the water theme. Ba’al Haturim says: From this point on, they travel along water the whole way. Kli Yakar says: This song of gratitude is not led by Moshe; it comes from the Israelites’ own heart.

    Water: The Torah’s symbol of rebirth and new beginnings. At the edge of the water, 40 years of wandering end, and a new independent, healthy, optimistic, grateful nation is born.

    Exactly one year ago, our family found some renewal in a simple household flood.

    Where in your life do you find waters of renewal?

    Reply
  15. Wendy

    From Rabbi David Seidenberg

    The Red Heifer Denudata — An Anthropological Exploration
    June 26, 2014
    (This essay is based on material from my book, Kabbalah & Ecology, coming out next fall/winter.)

    Most people think it’s impossible to explain the ritual of the red heifer. But it makes a lot of sense, if we apply some basic anthropology to it.

    Here’s the anthropological problem we need to focus on: Every society that eats meat needs to demonstrate to itself that animal bodies are different from human bodies, in order to explain why we can eat (other) animals and not people.

    You may think that the reasons are obvious, and that the problem is absurd — but the truth is that we only think that because of cultural assumptions we have been brought up to believe. In modern Western civilization, people have mostly denied that animals have souls, rights, or even feelings. However, if you think that animals do suffer, and that they have intrinsic needs that can take precedence over our needs — or if, like the Torah, you think that animals have what we call souls — then eating meat becomes a much more complicated problem, a moral problem.

    If you think animals have moral standing, then you can’t rely on the Cartesian argument that animals are machines without feelings to justify your meat-eating. If you think animals have needs that take precedence over what we want to do to them, then you can’t be fooled by the fact that society hides their suffering behind the industrial “meat production” system, which abuses animals from their birth until their death. If you think that way, you might also think you should be vegetarian.

    But the Torah does accept that animals have moral standing, souls, feelings. (See my article, “Animal Rights in the Jewish Tradition”, at https://www.academia.edu/1063285 .) Yet the Torah permits eating certain animals. That means Torah, and ancient Hebrew culture, needed to find a different way to distinguish between humans and animals than by ignoring animals’ needs and subjectivities. So, how does Torah make sense of why we can eat animals that are similar to us in so many ways?

    A hint is found in the rabbinic term for the Temple, Beit Hamikdash, literally “the house that makes holiness”. This term reflects the way in which the Temple overcame the tension between the intrinsic value of an animal’s life, and its use-value for us. The sacrificial process harvested, as it were, the intrinsic value of the animal for the sake of God — in other words, for a purpose greater than human needs or desires, something we might term its “holiness-value”. Most specifically, the sacrifice harvested the animal’s soul, its nefesh, which according to Torah is the blood. Otherwise, people were entirely prohibited from using the blood.

    In this way, the Torah taught us to find holiness in animals through sacrifices, while still affirming the intrinsic value and moral worth of animals.

    But it wasn’t just the sacrificial system that accomplished this. The Torah didn’t just apply a certain set of rituals to the animal’s body; it also applied completely different set of rituals to human bodies.

    That is to say, ancient Hebrew culture found holiness in different ways in animal bodies and human bodies. The sacrificial system of the korbanot (animal offerings) that was applied to animals’ bodies found holiness in an animal’s body by dividing up that body into sanctified parts, offered up to God in specific order upon the altar, whether in the Temple or the mishkan (the portable Temple in the desert). The purification system of tum’ah (cultic impurity) and taharah (cultic purity) that was applied to the human body found holiness in the body’s wholeness, which continually needed to be restored to the human body (or reinscribed onto it) through immersion in the waters of the mikveh and through related rituals that were performed whenever one came in contact with the sources of impurity. Those sources of impurity included substances thought of as disrupting the wholeness of the body, like semen and menstrual blood, as well as dead animals not properly slaughtered, and other sources.

    The Temple existed as the ground and center where these two symbolic systems and ritual regimes interacted. At its center was the altar, where the priest or kohen, who was ritually perfect, would sacrifice animals who were ritually perfect. Like everyone entering the Temple, the priest’s body had to be purified in the mikveh. But the perfection of the priest was measured not only in terms of the system of taharah, but also in terms of the sacrificial system — because, unlike everyone else, but exactly like the animals being sacrificed, the priest’s body had to be completely intact, without missing parts (or even being bald, i.e., missing hair).

    This framework can be used to understand the ritual of the red heifer described in Numbers 19, which we read about in this week’s Torah portion, called Chukat.
    That’s because the Temple altar was not the only place or time when these two systems of ritual “rightness” — of sacrifice and purity — overlapped. They also overlapped in the ritual of the red heifer.

    In fact, the secret of the red heifer ritual may be hidden in the need to connect these two systems of the korbanot and taharah. A truly red cow was extremely rare, and its ashes were necessary in order to purify anyone who had come in contact with a grave or a human bone or dead body. The red heifer or cow, in Hebrew, “parah adumah”, had to be wholly red/adumah (i.e., earth-colored), like Adam/human and adamah/soil, and like dam/blood. If a cow even had two hairs that were not red, it could not be used for the ritual. In the red heifer ritual, the redness of blood was externalized, so that the body of the heifer was whole in its color, in ways that reflected both the sacrificial system and the taharah system – combining elements of the taharah system and the korbanot.

    Like the priest who performed a sacrifice, the red heifer was also kept whole, again in ways that reflect both the sacrificial system and the taharah system — whole in its parts but also whole as a unified body. The heifer was slaughtered in a ritual that incorporated other wholly red items: red hyssop, cedar wood, and crimson (perhaps crimson-dyed thread). And then everything used in the ritual, along with the entire heifer, was wholly burnt. Even in the case of the olah offering in the Temple, where a bull was completely burned and none of it was eaten, the animal was still divided up precisely into parts which were placed in specific order on the altar. But the parah adumah had to be burned whole, without being divided.

    After the burning, the ashes from the red heifer were meant to be used to restore the wholeness of the human body in the case of its most extreme breach, which according to the Torah was contact with a human corpse. (Note that a corpse is called “nefesh” — the same word which we translate as soul, and the same word used by the Torah to describe the animal’s blood — “ki nafsho b’damo hu”. (Leviticus 17))

    Both the sacrifice of the heifer and the ritual of purification that used its ashes happened outside the Temple and the camp. The red heifer ritual thus formed the second pole of a circuit, whose opposite pole was the mishkan or Temple altar, where perfect whole humans offered the blood and parts of perfect animals. But the connection to the Temple was clear. Not only were the ashes of the parah adumah necessary for purifying someone who had contacted death before they could go to the Temple, but in the ritual itself, the priest would sprinkle blood from the heifer seven times in the direction of the Temple.

    (The way that the red heifer ritual inverts or turns inside out the rituals of the Temple is also the reason why the person who handles the ashes that are used for purification becomes impure or tam’ei. Think of it in terms of an analogy with multiplying negative numbers: if you multiply two negatives numbers you get a positive number, but if you multiply a positive and a negative, the result is negative. Note also that the severity of the impurity coming from a human body is the reason why kohanim — descendants of the priests — are traditionally not permitted to go into a cemetery, except for the sake of burying their immediate relatives: they have to avoid the tum’ah or impurity that comes from contact with a human corpse.)

    So, in conclusion, the Torah mandated a vast symbolic ritual system for treating human and animal bodies differently from each other. Yet at the same time, the Torah describes the parah adumah ritual, which connects the systems and completes the circle, so that at its heart, the Torah still acknowledges that the bodies and souls of the animals that people eat are not so different from our own.
    The parah adumah is famously given as the paradigmatic example of a Torah law that has no rational explanation. Yet it is rational, if one sees in it a kind of symbolic language. This way of explaining ritual systems is called “structuralism” in anthropology — seeing how meaning is created by the way different symbols interact with each other to create categories that make sense of the world. But it is also a “functionalist” explanation, in that the symbolic systems we are talking about meet a very real and necessary need that wasn’t just internal to the culture, even though it was expressed through culture. It solved a specific, real problem that almost every society has to solve. (The exceptions being societies that are cannibalistic, or societies that mandate strict vegetarianism, neither of hich need to differentiate human from animal bodies.)

    These rituals of taharah and of korbanot explained to people, in a way that was not intellectual but was instead acted out through rituals, how they could see animals as living, feeling beings with moral standing, and yet could kill and eat them. And the altar, at the heart and meeting place of these systems, and the red heifer ritual at society’s edge, where the systems also met, defined, as it were, the body of society, as it existed in relation to the more-than-human world, upon which all societies depend.

    Reply
  16. Wendy

    From Reb Mimi Feigelson

    Dying a Good Death, and Getting ‘There’ (Parshat Hukkat, Number 19:1-22:1)

    Dedicated to Rami Wernik z”l, cherished Jewish educator

    How do you want to die, and what are you doing to get there?

    In the world of real estate, the message is: “Location, location, location.” Somehow, it also seems an appropriate message when reading so many biblical stories, including (in Parshat Hukkat) that of Miriam’s death. The children of Israel, the whole congregation of Israel, arrive in the Zin desert, “and Miriam dies there and is buried there” (Numbers 20:1). The repetition of the word “there” suggests that the Torah may be speaking not only of a physical “there,” but also an emotional, mental, intellectual and spiritual “there.” The verse hints that the state-of-mind version of “there” may be more about the question of “with whom?” than “where?” as not only “the children of Israel” are mentioned, but specifically “the whole congregation.” Miriam was, it would seem, surrounded and accompanied by the entire people.

    The question of what characterizes a “good death” is as old as death itself. Early rabbinic sources speak of a person’s age at the time of their death, and how long they suffered at the end, as a measure of their righteousness or need for atonement. The Talmud is rich with stories of sages on their death beds and accounts of their parting acts and words.

    The first time I really thought about what constitutes a “good death” — and how important accompaniment is in defining it — was when I heard my teacher, Reb Shlomo Carlebach, ask this question: “Why did Adam eat from the tree of knowledge?” I remember at first rolling my internal eyes when hearing the question, being sure I would hear an answer that would roll off of me as if it had never touched me. Instead, he said something that has never left me, and has guided much of how I walk in the world. He said: “After Eve ate from the tree of knowledge, she started to die. She told Adam that she was afraid to die alone, and Adam said to her: ‘You don’t have to die alone, I will die with you!’ It is for this reason that he too ate from the tree of knowledge, so that they would die together!”

    My eyes tear up and my heart skips a beat every time I think of this answer. I heard a similar story in the name of the Hasidic master Reb Levi Yitzchak of Berdichev, that he told a woman on her death bed (who was afraid to die alone) that he was willing to die with her so she would be able to cross over in peace.

    Who are the people in your life who, if you were to hear that they were afraid to die alone, you would rush to their side — even to imagine dying with them? Who are the people in your life who, if you shared that you were afraid to die alone, would rush to your side — even up to imagining dying with you? And is the fear of dying alone much different than the fear of living alone?

    I’ve always wondered how Adam knew to answer Eve the way he did, where this intuition and wisdom came from. Perhaps he was echoing God, who says, “It is not good for the man to be alone…” (Genesis 2: 18). God doesn’t say it is hard to be alone, there is too much work to do alone, or it is boring to be alone, but that being alone is not good. But how would God what it even means to be “alone” if it weren’t that God was sharing, as it were, from the depths of the Divine heart, the Divine experience of aloneness?

    We learn from the world of rabbinic midrash that God created a world with which to be in relationship; God’s very self knew aloneness, and responded by creating a human companion — and then, a companion for the first human. Adam tapped into Divine wisdom and experience, and understood the profundity of the related fears of living alone and dying alone — and the capacity of human beings to assure that people don’t live or die alone.

    The Zen Roshi, anthropologist, and hospice caregiver Dr. Joan Halifax, in her book Being with Dying, suggests three questions. She asks that we take three minutes — not less, and definitely not more — to describe in as much detail as possible what would be the most horrific death we could imagine for ourselves. She asks for feelings, emotions, location, timing, as rich of a description that we are capable of. Then we are asked to do the same regarding what we could imagine to be the best death we could ask for ourselves — again, in as much detail as possible. She then poses a third question: How are you living to bring yourself to that best death?

    I live much of the time between these questions with which my teachers have challenged me –who would I die with, who in my life would die with me, and how I am leading my life to bring me closer to my “best death”. I have a vision of sitting with my students, and we are laughing together, and all of a sudden one of them notices that I am no longer laughing.

    Returning to Miriam –“And Miriam dies there and is buried there” — Parker Palmer (an educator and activist who focuses on issues of community and spirituality) offers the following that we might read as another response to the question of what “there” is. In a recent interview, he says: “So, showing up with everything I’ve got — my darkness as well as my light — is, I think, part of ultimately dying a good death. Dying with the ability to say, ‘To the best of my ability, I showed up in the world with everything I’ve got.’ ”

    The sages of the Talmud (in Tractate Moed Katan, 28a) tell us that Miriam died “the kiss of death”, the ultimate way of dying in their eyes: It was God that kissed her, and in this kiss inhaled her last breath, and is still holding it. We might say that for Miriam, “there” was about the closest presence of God and human beings. Bringing in Palmer’s perspective, we might imagine that her “there” also included the presence of her own full humanity, embracing her darkness as well as her light.

    I share these questions for contemplation: What is for each of us a good death, and how will we each get “there”?

    Seventy Faces of Torah is a pluralistic Jewish scriptural commentary, produced by The Center for Global Judaism at Hebrew College, in which thought leaders from around the world offer insights into the weekly Torah portion and contemporary social, political, and spiritual life.

    Reply
  17. Wendy

    From AJR/CA

    “Death and Mourning”
    By Rabbi Cheryl Weiner, PhD, BCC, ‘07

    Chukat presents a provocative narrative that illuminates aspects of death, grief and mourning. We discover the roots of some of our rituals: sitting Shivah (for seven days), mourning through Shloshim (for thirty days), and washing our hands after leaving a cemetery. While the import of the ritual of the Red Heifer remains somewhat of a mystery, the power of its legacy remains with us in our rites of spiritual passage from one state of being to another through death, and also in our understanding of sex and birth being linked to mortality.

    When we have been in contact with death, God tells us how to cleanse ourselves with the waters of niddah, which combine mei chayyim (living waters) with the ashes of an unblemished red heifer that has been ritually slaughtered and cremated. After contact with death, we remain unclean for seven days and we are purified through the ritual of washing with the waters of niddah, corresponding to the seven days of Shivah and the ritual of washing our hands upon leaving a cemetery and a house of mourning. (Using flowing water as a purification rite also leads to the mikvah/ ritual bath that is used as a purification method when we move from one state of being to another.)

    We begin with the waters of niddah as the antidote for contact with death. Then, Miriam dies. Then, Aaron dies. And we know that Moses will die as well. The generation that brought the Israelites through the desert is deserting them. However, through God’s Grace, the Israelites are given lessons that teach them how to deal with death.

    Biblical Midrashic stories reiterated through feminist commentary, contrast the deaths of Miriam and Aaron. When Miriam dies, the people become angry and upset. There has been no succession and Miriam’s Well that provided water disappears with her. Clearly, Moses is distraught at her death and the disturbance it has raised. God tells Moses and Aaron to speak to a rock, to access water, and Moses instead hits the rock. God is so angered by this that God informs both that neither will enter the Promised Land. This is huge failure of succession. Thus, when Aaron is about to die, God makes sure that the succession is clarified. Moses deliberately passes the high priesthood from Aaron to his son. When Aaron dies, the Israelites grieve for thirty days, corresponding to Shloshim the ritual second stage of mourning rituals.

    Through this set of ritual and rites of passage, the Torah gives us the foundation for establishing our roadmap through death, loss, and grief. We deeply mourn for seven days, understanding that we are in a period of “tomei” of impurity. We have passed from one stage of life to another and are in a liminal state of separation. It is fascinating that the Hebrew word ‘niddah’ means separation as does ‘kaddesh’, the root of the word sanctification and the prayer for the dead (and the name of the place where Miryam is buried). It is interesting to ponder the nature of those separations. They don’t signify isolation and they don’t imply exclusion. They merely indicate that when people are in the state of mourning, they need to be separated from the normality of their lives.

    Symbolically, one has to separate from death through the waters of niddah, through a ritual that breaks through the pattern of deep grief into mourning. In the period of shloshim, we mourn, but we go about our life, with a new consciousness. Our lives shift. Our relationships change. We are taught to prepare for these shifts, through succession and through knowing where our wells are, both physically and spiritually, lest we allow anger to cloud our judgment of how to behave.

    With our mourning rituals, we can relate back to this enigmatic parashah that discusses death and its aftermath and gives us the mayyim chayim, the living waters, and the mai niddah, the water of separation, and the curious sacrifice of the red heifer. We are given a way to transition from ritual impurity to purity and whatever meaning we attribute to the transformation from one state of being to the other.

    Reply
  18. Wendy

    From Rabbi Rachel Barenblat

    The smith speaks

    I had work for a while.
    The women donated mirrors
    and I made the basin for the place
    where God’s presence dwells.

    Since then I’ve tended goats.
    What else is there
    for a coppersmith to do
    in this unsettled wilderness?

    I missed the tasks of forging
    but no one becomes free
    without some sacrifice.
    Still, others grumble.

    They say Moshe dragged us here
    to feed his ego. They bitch
    if Moshe and God really cared
    we would never have left Egypt.

    In response God sent snakes.
    Wailing spread across the camp
    as limbs blackened and puffed up,
    as puncture wounds putrefied.

    The families of the bitten
    begged Moshe to seek God’s help.
    As though they hadn’t slandered him
    to anyone who would listen.

    As though their attributions
    wouldn’t wound him, wouldn’t
    bruise his human heart.
    I don’t know how he set that aside

    but this morning he instructed me
    to go to the men for their bracelets.
    I crafted a curling snake
    as copper-red as tongues of fire.

    Moshe said “mount it on a miracle.”
    A flagpole was the best I could do.
    When the snakebit looked upon it
    their wounds disappeared.

    How did the snake I myself made
    channel healing from the One?
    Remembering now, my hands shake.
    I want to return to my goats.

    Reply
  19. Wendy

    From Rabbi Laura Duhan Kaplan

    Wars of the Lord

    There it is, slipped so casually into the Biblical narrative: Thus it was said in the Book of the Wars of the Lord (Numbers 21:14). Aren’t you curious about that famous book, and why you’ve never read it?

    So were our classical commentators. Yonatan Ben Uzziel, (Babylonia, c. 3rd century) decided: it’s another name for the Torah. Rabbi Abraham Ibn Ezra (Spain, 11th century) decided: It’s a freestanding book, dating from the days of Abraham, but lost to us moderns. Rashi (France 11th century) said: It’s an idiomatic expression referring to stories of God’s miracles.

    I’m curious about that famous book, too. And not just because obscure Biblical references are fun puzzles. But because Wars of the Lord is a topic of great contemporary interest. People of many different religious traditions claim to be fighting them, right now. Their more peaceful co-religionists denounce their militarist spirit, and secularists run from the horrors of religion altogether. Who is right? And can the Book of the Wars of the Lord help us decide?

    Diverse views of religious war existed in Biblical times, too. The prophet Samuel thought marching under the banner of God is a good national project. Samuel would not support a king who disagreed. The book of Deuteronomy also affirms such a project — as long as ethical rules of warfare are followed. The book of Judges, however, describes multiple tragedies caused by religious fervor in war.

    The book of Numbers points us towards a fourth perspective, I think. When it speaks of Wars of the Lord, it does not refer to acts of human armies. Instead, it hints at wars that God conducts in the heavenly realm. Think about it – it’s perfectly consistent with the narrative of Numbers.

    All the books of the Torah recount miracles, but Numbers stands out for its use of magical realism. Just before Wars of the Lord, we read about an irrational ritual for healing grief; water flowing from a rock at God’s word; and a copper snake neutralizing snake venom. Shortly after Wars, the Israelites defeat the giant King Og and the semi-divine King Sichon, descendent of the Nephilim. No human army could have subdued these mythical monsters. Israelite victories reflect Wars of the Lord, waged in a heavenly realm.

    According to visions of the Prophet Zechariah, Wars of the Lord belong only in the heavenly realm. Our human role is to support God by building a just society on earth. Zechariah’s first night vision features horses reporting that the world is at peace. But the report upsets Zechariah’s angelic companion, who cries out to God to set the world aright by waging war. Three more visions reveal the role assigned to humans in God’s campaign. We must de-politicize religion, stop cheating our most vulnerable social classes, and get serious about banishing evil from our land. Only then will God deploy the heavenly horse-drawn chariots in battle — a battle that will not advantage one nation over another, but bring all to the same fate.

    Maybe these heavenly wars actually happen – and maybe they don’t. All metaphysical theories about the true reality that drives our world are speculations. But, for sure, important traditions in our Torah tell us NOT to solve problems by marching to war under God’s banner. Instead, they teach, we should focus our efforts on justice, for that is the role assigned to human soldiers in God’s cosmic battle for this good planet earth.

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  20. Wendy

    From Brian Yosef Schacter-Brooks

    The Mystery of Music- Parshat Hukat

    V’yik’khu eilekha fara aduma t’mimah-
    And they should take to you a cow that is red, completely…

    In Parshat Hukat, it says, Zot hukat haTorah- This is the hok- the decree of the Torah- v’yik’khu eilekha fara aduma t’mimah- and they should take to you a cow that is red, completely.

    The red cow is then burned up, and the ashes are mixed with water to make a special potion for purifying anyone who touches a corpse. The premise behind this is that if you touch a corpse, you become tamei, which means ritually unfit or impure, so that you wouldn’t be able to engage in certain rituals without first doing a purification process. So what’s this all about?

    The Hassidic master, Rabbi Mordechai Yosef, known as The Ishbitzer, taught that “death” represents the past, because the past is over already; it’s dead. The tuma, teaches the Ishbitzer, is really anger or resentment about something from the past. That’s because feelings of negativity and judgment about something that’s already happened keep you stuck- you’re holding on to something that you really need to let go of- and that’s the tuma- the spiritual “contamination” so to speak.

    Now the red cow is itself the very embodiment of death. Why? Because it’s a living creature that’s completely burned up. It’s also completely red, the color of the blood that bleeds out of a slaughtered animal, as well as the fire that destroys the form of the animal.

    So why does this symbol of death cure someone from the contamination of death? Because the contamination, the tuma, comes from resisting death- from being angry at something in the past- from not letting go. To be cured from your resistance, you have to accept whatever you’re resisting; you have to embrace it. So paradoxically, it’s in embracing the past that you let go of the past, because being stuck means that you were holding on to an idea of how it should have been. Now that you accept what has been, you get soaked with the ashes of the red cow, so to speak, and you can let go of it. Then you’re tahor- purified from that clinging, that holding on, so that you can fully come into the present, into the sacred dimension of simply Being.

    So how do you do that? How do you accept whatever you’re resisting, and let go of it? In other words, what are the “red cow ashes” we can use today?

    There’s a Hebrew cipher known as Atbash in which you connect every Hebrew letter with another Hebrew letter, so that the first letter, alef, gets connected with the last letter, tav. The second letter, bet, gets connected with the second to last letter, shin, and so on. In this way, you can substitute letters in words to come up with new words. According to kabbalah, words that are connected through Atbash have a connection in meaning as well.

    Now the word for being spiritually whole and pure is tahor. Through atbash we can substitute a nun for the tet, making nahor. Rearrange the letters, and you have rinah- song. And that’s exactly the power of song and music in general- to transform negativity and resistance not necessarily by turning away from it, but by turning into it.

    Why? Because music makes it feel good to feel bad- hence the blues, as well as a lot of mournful Jewish liturgy, the krekh of the clarinet in Klezmer music, and a thousand other examples.

    That’s the miracle of music- it makes it feel good to feel bad- it transforms negativity without negating it, allowing you to accept and even embrace whatever it is you’re resisting. And out of that letting go grows the realization that there’s only One Reality- there’s not me, on one hand, and that thing I’m judging, on the other, there’s just What Is- there’s just Hashem- Reality, Being, God. As Rebbe Nachman said, “The most direct means for attaching yourself to God is through music and song. Even if you can’t sing well, sing. Sing to yourself. Sing in the privacy of your home, but sing.”

    But why? How does music work anyway? That’s the great hok, the great mystery of music itself, and its power to bring us deeply into the depths of our present experience and open us to the wholeness that we are.

    So on this Shabbat Hukat- the Sabbath of the Mystery- I bless you to use your voice in prayer and song. “Even if you can’t sing well, sing. Sing to yourself. Sing in the privacy of your home, but sing.”

    Good Shabbos!

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